Photo 15 Feb 37 notes smarterplanet:

Connected Cars: How to Accelerate Mainstream Adoption | Mashable
Every so often, the media tells us about an automotive manufacturer  on the cusp of delivering wireless, cooperative systems. The reader  immediately thinks of Knight Rider, and wanders through a fantasy of connected car heaven.
However, this type of news is often miles from accurate; connected  car offerings in the near-to-distant future are a different reality.  This article examines the delays behind that “nearly done” automotive  technology, and analyzes the value of our research dollars.
In 2005, several automakers introduced cooperative, wireless systems at the Intelligent Transportation Society World Congress in the parking lot of the San Francisco Giants’s then SBC Park. Messages were sent vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure via dedicated short-range communications (DSRC) or, as it would later be renamed, “IEEE 802.11p (5.9 GHz).”
Most of the applications were safety-related systems that offered a  seemingly futuristic understanding of position, speed and road  conditions. But that was six long years ago – so, what has changed?  Apart from the Giants stadium name-change, not much. Technology is no  closer to the marketplace. Let’s explore why.

smarterplanet:

Connected Cars: How to Accelerate Mainstream Adoption | Mashable

Every so often, the media tells us about an automotive manufacturer on the cusp of delivering wireless, cooperative systems. The reader immediately thinks of Knight Rider, and wanders through a fantasy of connected car heaven.

However, this type of news is often miles from accurate; connected car offerings in the near-to-distant future are a different reality. This article examines the delays behind that “nearly done” automotive technology, and analyzes the value of our research dollars.

In 2005, several automakers introduced cooperative, wireless systems at the Intelligent Transportation Society World Congress in the parking lot of the San Francisco Giants’s then SBC Park. Messages were sent vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure via dedicated short-range communications (DSRC) or, as it would later be renamed, “IEEE 802.11p (5.9 GHz).”

Most of the applications were safety-related systems that offered a seemingly futuristic understanding of position, speed and road conditions. But that was six long years ago – so, what has changed? Apart from the Giants stadium name-change, not much. Technology is no closer to the marketplace. Let’s explore why.

  1. kyauphie reblogged this from emergentfutures
  2. kwaterphal reblogged this from smarterplanet
  3. homeownersinsurancemiami reblogged this from emergentfutures
  4. kyler74 reblogged this from emergentfutures
  5. latejo reblogged this from emergentfutures
  6. allthesefeelsifeel reblogged this from emergentfutures and added:
    finally I’ll be able to tell the guy in front of me that like his rims are messed up or his tires low or just be able to...
  7. oceanandpopsicle reblogged this from emergentfutures
  8. canibefashone reblogged this from emergentfutures
  9. futuristlab reblogged this from smarterplanet and added:
    Future transportation…
  10. ricardocamargo reblogged this from emergentfutures
  11. emergentfutures reblogged this from smarterplanet
  12. pktemp reblogged this from smarterplanet
  13. jcahill reblogged this from smarterplanet
  14. a360 reblogged this from smarterplanet
  15. smarterplanet posted this

Design crafted by Prashanth Kamalakanthan. Powered by Tumblr.